The past two months have been hectic, filled with travel, talks, awards, movies and a steady flow of work at Light Projects.

It seems like an annual sequence of visits to Copenhagen Center of Lys Mexico and Scandinavia has been established.  My entry on the October 15th CIHAC Sustainable Lighting conference in Mexico City can be found here.  Left, November 5th, on stage in Copenhagen, Center for Lys. A larger collection of this city’s images and movies to be posted soon.

After that it was a whirlwind tour – On November 13th to Dallas for the Main Street Garden Park ribbon cutting – here is a tiny movie that sums up the project on the new Light Projects’ YouTube channel.

From Dallas it was a short trip, on the 14th to Louisville to meet new Light Projects collaborators, CARMEN landscape architects, for a streetscape and underpass project adjacent to the new arena, and to create a new gateway to the wonderful Hargreaves-designed waterfront.  More to come on this as we move through the concept phase.

Back to New York City for a breath of metropolitan air, I gave a presentation to the Professional Lighting Design Association on LightMapping on November 18th, then off to Boston to speak on a panel for Build Boston.  I joined fellow Society for Design Administrators on a panel; Business Manager – Hire, Fire or Inspire on the 19th of the month.

Lightmapping NYC-Shades of Night Study

Hopped on Amtrak, for another weekend home in the Big Apple, leaving in the wee hours Monday, November 23rd to travel to Fort Worth, Texas for a feasibility study presentation for Starry Trail Crossing, Light Projects’ new commission for a public art sculpture to be integrated on the replacement bridge at West Seventh Street.

Upon return to New York City, Interior Design Magazine informs that Light Projects’ colorful infrastructure project, Triple Bridge Gateway has been selected for a Merit Award (an outdoor luminous room?). Recipients and friends congregated at the swanky party held at the Guggenheim Museum on December 3.

Jewel-Light Luminaire (TM)

Coming soon, Wednesday, December 9th, the Jewel-Light Luminaire (TM) launch.  Culminating a four year development of an LED globe lighting fixture, Leni Schwendinger Light Projects has teamed up with Lighting Science Group to commercialize the product.  I envision these pearls-with-diamonds-inset on bridges, towers, building tops – creating sparkling joyful environments – whether infrastructural or architectural.

Next… bring on the holidays!

A discussion in two parts, with Kay Kallos, Dallas Public Art Program Manager, covers the inception and objectives of the integrated artwork at the newly opened Main Street Garden in Dallas.

Audio links

Interview Part 1

Artist Leni Schwendinger discusses her new work, SpectraScape, at the new Main Street Garden Park located at 1902 Main Street in downtown Dallas. SpectraScape is a site-specific artwork comprised of bands of light that scroll across the green glass study shelters at Main Street Garden Park.

Intreview Part 2

SpectraScape refers to the garden through the use of four seasonal color palettes derived from the seasonal park plantings—rust and gold for fall, pink, yellow and green for summer, green, blue, and white for winter and green and yellow for spring. Each season is proclaimed through rhythmic sequences of colors and tones that race across the tops of the study shelters.


Downtown central Dallas is being recast.

spectrascape01

Traditionally, the city center has been associated with such iconic non-residential structures as Neiman-Marcus’ flagship store, the once- flamboyant Statler-Hilton building and the “Old City Hall” notorious for Jack Ruby’s slaying of Lee Harvey Oswald. DOWNTOWN DALLAS, a business improvement district, has been formed, and buildings heretofore industrial and commercial, such as the moderne-style Mercantile, formerly a bank building with radio transmitter and an illuminated clock tower, have been renovated for housing.

SpectraScape rendering and color palette

SpectraScape rendering and color palette

I worked closely with the park designer, Thomas Balsley, to develop the park’s lighting scheme so a subsequent public artwork commission was a natural progression which built on my understanding of the uses and types of park visitors.  University of North Texas’ law school is slated to move into the Old City Hall and I envisioned students with laptops and law books as primary park visitors.

Inverted “L” shaped green, glass shade-structures were designed by the architect to stand along the edge of Main Street. The structures are set off by a long triangle of seasonally planted, colorful striated gardens.  I thought of the structures “study carrels”, envisioning a light that might switch on when students or other visitor entered for reading during warm Texas evenings.

Using the color and stripes of the gardens as a launch point, I envisioned sleek lines of light integrated into the shelters’ edges.  Narrow bands of animated stripes, viewed in series will attract passersby.

Light Projects’ Design Manager, Ute Besenecker, has been instrumental throughout the design and implementation process and we have worked closely with interactive designer Ed Purver for programming.

Thus SpectraScape was conceptualized.

Here, a full sized mock up is presented on a warm evening, July 31, 2009. (See low-resolution movie)

Mock-up July 31, 2009

Winter (left) / Summer (center-left) / Autumn (center-right) / Downtown Dallas neighbors viewing

A bonus; the dynamic, luminous lines are visible day and night, adding a moth to flame effect from afternoon into the night.

Hangzhou (杭州市区)

Today Hangzhou is an important cultural center in China.  It was the capital of the Song Dynasty, starting 1127,  for close to one-hundred years – until the Mongols invaded.  At that time it was one of the most populated cities of the world – estimated at one million.  Throughout its legendary history, Hangzhou has been described an honored as the  “City of Civilization”, “Land Abundant in Fish and Rice”, “Home of Silk”, and the “Capital of Tea”.   Several friends had informed me in advance that the adventurer/explorer Marco Polo described Hangzhou as “the finest and noblest city in the world”.

On Saturday, June 13, we arrived to scenic West Lake (西湖) one of Hangzhou’s most visited sites, where we assembled for a traditional lunch on the banks of the Lake.

Camille Liang, an YGLS Account Executive accompanied us on the second leg of the trip

Camille Liang, an YGLS Account Executive accompanied us

Although it was daytime when we arrived – I could see the romanticism of the district emphasized by ornate streetlights and through later conversation and reading I learned that West Lake is famous for light shows and fireworks. After lunch we visited the West Lake  Zoo to meet the panda, birds, reptiles and fauna indigenous to China and Asia.

In the evening we had dinner with  Mr. Shen Wei of  Zhejiang Urban Construction Garden Designing Institute – selecting ingredients in sidewalk bins which were served in novel and delicious ways.

Images courtesy Wei Shen and Mondo Magazine

Grand Canal images courtesy Shen Wei and Mondo Magazine

Mr. Shen took us to the Grand Canal (大运河),  A spectacular man-made waterway flowing over 1,000 miles, the most ancient sections were started in the 5th century BC, and partially navigated sections were combined in 581–618 AD. There we experienced the recently opened lighting installation by Roger Narboni (with management by Zongtai Lighting group) – a collage of green-illuminated trees, large scale blue rectangles hovering over the water and softly lined and lighted bridges. On the opposite bank Shen’s designed -and -installed architectural lighting installation marked the landmark wooden buildings which have just been renovated – echoing with pre-tenant emptiness. Luminous red plexi-and-metal lanterns are effective here – creating a mysterious and quiet pattern of markers, and the building eaves are lined with white LED. In both lighting installations I question the use of cool stark white — and would rather have seen a soft candlelight color — more difficult to attain with LED.

Suzhou Train Station

Suzhou Train Station

Suzhou (苏州)

A smaller town than Hangzhou or mega-city Guangzhou, Suzhou is known as a garden city.  Four-thousand years old, Suzhou is one of China’s  “24 Cultural and Historic Cities “.  Additionally, Suzhou is known for its historic creative personae –   “remarkable politicians, philosophers, strategists, scientists and artists”.  Today prominent cultural institutions and talents reside in Suzhou.

An infinate variety of handmade paving patterns

An infinite variety of handmade paving patterns at the Lion Forest Garden

Well preserved are Suzhou’s double chessboard layout of  “water and land in parallel, canal and street in neighbor”, its network of rivers and canals composing three vertical, three horizontal and one ring, and its unique landscape of “small bridge, flowing water, white wall, black tile, cultural relics and classic gardens”. In today’s Suzhou there are 487 cultural relics under municipal-and-upper level protection, of which 15 are under state-level protection and 101 are under provincial protection. Over 60 classical gardens are well preserved and nine of them are listed in the Catalog of World Cultural Heritage,  Humble Administrator’s Garden, Lingering Garden , Master-of-Nets Garden, Mountain Villa of Embracing Beauty, Surging Wave Pavilion, Lion Forest Garden, Garden of Cultivation, (among others). –Suzhou Culture and History Website

LionsForest

In 1991 I studied the “kare sansui” (dry landscapes), while living in Japan under the auspices of a Japan-US Friendship Society grant.  I understood that the rock garden concept and craft was “borrowed” from the Chinese. Viewing the Chinese-designed rock-gardens has been a life-long goal.  We visited the Lion Forest Garden (獅子林). The entry sign informed of  caves and tunnels — which I could not picture.  Japanese garden design did not prepare me for the experience to come.

Suddenly we were in a cool, dim cave.  I fell in love with the framing of each view from under and over the rocks. An invitation to climb was implicit. We did. Walking along the rim of the naturally hewn rough rocks and then down the man-made steps and edges was exciting and enthralling… a highly aesthetic adventure playground.

Ciao Italy — Ancona, Urbino and Rome; compliments iGuzzini, Sistemalux and Dulanski Group.

Part 1: Fratelli Guzzini factory visit in Ancona

Leni peers through display of Guzzini 1960 wares

Leni peers through a transparent display of Guzzini tableware

Guzzini’s “Multimateriality and the culture of detail” household articles have been created since 1912 –when oxbow horn was molded  into objects.

Fratelli Guzzini introduced plexiglas to the domestic landscape in 1938.  In 1940 Guzzini designers formed clear plastic tableware, in 1950 elegant and colorful plastics for the table were designed and these lines have  been recently reissued.  In 1960 they created moldable acrylic forms.

In1970 melamine was invented (growing up in LA our family table was set with white melamine and Russel Wright‘s grey and brown ceramic dinnerware). In 1980 mixed materials such as porcelain and steel articles were manufactured and in the 1990s gas-assisted injection moulding techniques were used.

Guzzini 2008 - "happy hour" line

Guzzini 2008 - Horeca happy hour line by designer Viglino Carlo

Currently Guzzini is focusing on innovating and continuing to develop the company’s unique style, “suggestive furniture objects” and making acrylic tableware that is “difficult to copy”.

leni-guzzini1_crp

I noticed that designers are proudly referenced at the Guzzini lines whether for tableware, bath/spa design or lighting.

More to come…